Ball Valves For Steam Service: How the JFlow DM4600 Series Solves The Limitations of Steam Service Ball Valves

We all know that when water is heated beyond its boiling point, it vaporizes into steam.

However, did you know that not all steam is equal?

Depending on the both the pressure and temperature that steam is exposed to, its properties can be very different.

Types of Steam

Saturated Steam: Results when heated water is heated to its boiling point and begins to vaporize.

Wet Saturated Steam: The most common form of steam. A Mixture of saturated steam that contains condensed water particles from water molecules that are not vaporized.

Dry Saturated Steam; Saturated steam that is free of water particles.

Super Heated Steam: When Saturated steam is heated beyond the saturated steam level. This yields steam that has a higher temperature and lower density than saturated steam have at the same pressure.

Steam and steam condensate are generally more corrosive than water due to the presence of dissolved gases, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. These elements can cause the steam and ball of the valve to corrode

Limitations of Ball Valves in Steam Service

In general, ball valves for steam service are rated at a lower temperature than for liquid or gas service. There are three main reasons for this:

  1. Wet steam can damage the ball when the ball is opened or closed or when throttling the valve.
  2. Opening and closing the valve can also damage the PTFE or RPTFE seats in the valve.
  3. Steam and steam condensate are generally more corrosive than water due to the presence of dissolved gases, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. These elements can cause the steam and ball of the valve to corrode.

How The JFlow DM4600 Series Ball Valves For Steam Service Solves These Limitations:

To solve the first problem of damage to the ball, the JFlow DM4600 series uses a vented ball with a 1/8” drill hole in the top of the ball slot to prevent excessive pressure build-up in the cavity from the trapped liquid when the valve is in the closed position.

The second issue is solved by using TFM 1600 seats and seals for low-pressure steam (261 psi @ 403°F)  and by using TFM 4215 seats and seals for saturated steam and high-pressure steam. (378 psi @ 437°F)

The JFlow DM4600 Series Ball Valves for Steam Service solves the third limitation by the application of an electroless nickel coating (also known as autocatalytic coating). This is actually a nickel-phosphorus alloy. Electroless nickel has the unusual quality of being amorphous and not crystalline in structure. These coatings possess high hardness, uniform thickness, natural lubricity, extended service life and abrasion resistance. Shutdowns and delays in industries that use steam can be quite common because of the need to replace components, but as electroless nickel substantial extends the life of parts and components, a vast amount of money can be saved. The coating also provides an excellent surface condition for ball plugs and improves the sealing at the seat areas.

To learn more about the JFlow DM4600 Series Ball Valves for steam service click here

What is a Vented Ball Valve and When Do You Use It?

Quick-what’s the world’s most popular form of transportation?
If you guessed a car or plane……you’re wrong.
The most common form of transport is…

The humble, ever flowing pipeline.
The sheer volume of fluid and gas that quietly passes through pipelines under our feet and all around us, every hour boggles the mind. To make sure this process runs efficiently and safely, pipes need a way of regulating how much fluid can pass through them. This is where ball valves come in handy.
Ball valves are like levers or switches that can turn pipes on and off or raise or lower the amount of fluid flowing through them.

Here’s How Ball Valves Work:

In a ball valve, a hollow sphere (the ball) sits snugly inside the pipeline, completely blocking the fluid or gas from flowing. Turn the valve’s handle and the ball moves, allowing the fluid to flow freely through the middle of it.
However, in certain applications, excessive pressure can build up inside the ball. When pressure builds, the bubble-tight seal of the ball valve prevents the trapped gas or fluid from escaping. The pressure build up can damage the ball and in extreme cases, can cause an explosion inside the valve. This is especially true in applications involving liquid oxygen or nitrogen or bleach.

 

How To Prevent Pressure Build Up Using a Vented Ball Valve

The most common and effective way to relieve damaging pressure is to vent the ball valve through a second, smaller hole in the ball. This hole allows the fluid or gas trapped inside the ball to escape, preventing damage to the ball while relieving the pressure. Vented ball valves are segmented as either vented internally or externally ( Where the vent is located on the valve.) and whether the vent is facing upstream or downstream. Upstream is the side from which the flow arrives. Downstream is where the flow goes after it leaves the valve.

Here’s How External Vented Ball Valves Work

The vent allows trapped pressure to pass harmlessly away from the system directly into atmosphere when the valve is closed. The ball contains a vent that is isolated from the ball hollow to prevent continuous leakage from the body vent port when the valve is open. The downstream vent provides an exhaust path for the fluid downstream of the valve. The upstream vent provides an escape path for the fluid upstream of the valve.

External Vented Ball Valve

External vents allow trapped pressure to pass harmlessly away from the system directly into atmosphere when the valve is closed. The external vent is isolated from the ball hollow to prevent continuous leakage from the body vent port when the valve is open.

How An External Vented Ball Valve Operates Downstream

When the valve is open, system fluids flow through the valve. No venting occurs because the vent passage is separated from the flow path.


Screen Shot 2016-05-12 at 2.35.44 PM

External Downstream Vent

No venting occurs because the vent passage is separated from the flow path.


When the valve is closed, shutoff occurs on on the upstream side only. Downstream fluids flow through the vent passage to the vent port and are released to atmosphere.

External Downstream Vent (Valve Closed)

When the valve is closed, shutoff occurs only on the
upstream side. Downstream fluids flow through the vent passage to the vent port and are passed harmlessly to atmosphere.

How An External Vented Ball Valve Operates Upstream

When the valve is in the open position, system fluids flow through the valve. No venting occurs because the vent passage is isolated from the flow path of the fluid.

External Upstream Vented Ball Valve

When the valve is open, system fluids flow through the valve.
No venting occurs because the vent passage is isolated from the flow path.

When the valve is in the closed position, shutoff occurs only on the downstream side. Upstream fluids flow through the vent passage to the vent port and are released to atmosphere.

 

External Upstream Vented Ball Valve

When the valve is closed, shutoff occurs only on the downstream side. Upstream fluids flow through the vent passage to the vent port and are passed harmlessly into atmosphere.

How An Internal Vented Ball Valves Work

The internal vent equalizes pressure in the ball and valve body to the same as the system, protecting the valve from damaging pressure build up. The ball has a vent that intersects the hollow part of the ball at a 90° angle. (See Image) The downstream vent equalizes pressure in the ball and body to that of the downstream system when the ball is in the closed position. The upstream vent insures the fluid pressure is equalized to that of the upstream system when the ball is in the closed position.

The ball contains a vent passage that intersects the ball orifice at a 90° angle. There are no external vent ports

The ball contains a vent  that intersects the ball’s hollow at a 90° angle. There are no external vent ports

How An Internal Vented Ball Valve Operates Downstream

When the valve is in the open position, system fluids flow through the valve. The vent passage allows pressure inside the valve to remain equal to system pressure.

Internal Downstream Vented Ball Valve

When the valve is open, system fluids flow through the valve. The vent passage allows pressure inside the valve to remain equal to system pressure.

When the valve is closed, the vent passage faces downstream. This allows pressure to equalize between the valve body and the downstream system.

When the valve is closed, the vent passage faces downstream, allowing pressure to equalize between the body and the downstream system.

When the valve is closed, the vent passage faces downstream. This allows pressure to equalize between the valve body and the downstream system.

How An Internal Vented Ball Valve Operates Upstream

When the valve is in the open position, fluids flow through the valve. The vent passage allows pressure inside the valve to remain equal to system pressure.

When the valve is in the open position, fluids flow through the valve. The vent passage allows pressure inside the valve to remain equal to system pressure.

When the valve is in the closed position, the vent passage faces the upstream side. This allows pressure to equalize between the body and the upstream system.

Internal Upstream Vented Ball Valve (Valve Closed)

When the valve is in the closed position, the vent passage faces the upstream side. This allows pressure to equalize between the body and the upstream system.

Vented ball valves are actually an excellent solution to relieving damaging pressure build up in pipelines. They can be used in a variety of applications. They are commonly used in refrigeration units, cryogenic applications, and high pressure air lines that incorporate automated gates for safety reasons. To learn more about JFlow Controls Vented Ball Valves click here.

8 Best Articles on What is a Solenoid Valve and How Do They Work

1

The 8 Best Articles on What is a Solenoid Valve and How Does it Work

Quite a few of our website visitors want to know “What is a solenoid valve” and “How do solenoids work?” To help you out, we pulled together eight of the best and most up-to-the-minute articles, infographics and videos on the internet that explain everything you need to know about solenoid valves. Including how they work and what are the best applications in which to use them.

A solenoid, (from the French solénoïde) according to Wikipedia, “is a coil wound into a tightly packed helix.” A solenoid valve is defined as “an integrated device containing an electromechanical solenoid which actuates either a pneumatic or hydraulic valve.”

Now that we have the technical definitions out of the way, let’s get started:

Here are, in no particular order, some easy to understand articles and videos that can answer all your questions about solenoid valves as well as hopefully spark some ideas on how you can use them to solve your flow challenges.

Note: We know that there are other pieces of content that we might have missed. Feel free to add them in the comments.

1. How A 2-Way Normally Closed Solenoid Valve Works

Source: Pinterest: Discover and save creative ideas

“Solenoid valves make automation of fluids and gas control possible. Modern solenoid valves offer fast operation, high reliability, long service life, and compact design..”Read More

2. How does a direct acting solenoid valve work?

Source: How does a direct acting solenoid valve work? – YouTube

This short video explains the function of direct acting solenoid valves, using Bürkert’s 3/2 way Type 6014 valve to demonstrate..

3. A Tutorial on Solenoid Control Valves by fluid control experts

Source: Solenoid Control valves | Proportional Valves | Burkert

“Checklist for choosing the correct solenoid control valve

1.What medium (fluid) do you want to control?

With regard to its chemical-physical reaction behaviour, it must be checked whether the valve parts in contact with the medium are compatible with the medium itself.

2. How high is the maximum operating pressure?

The valve must be able to shut off the highest pressure in the application.

3.What are the process data?

For optimal sizing of the valve orifice there are some issues to be cleared up…” Read More

4. Solenoid Valve – A Beginners Guide

Source: Solenoid Valve, ASCO Valves, How Do Solenoid Valves Work, What Is A Solenoid Valve

“A solenoid valve is an electromechanical valve which is normally used for the fluid control of water, air, oil or gas. They are made up of two components. The solenoid (essentially consisting of a coil, core, core tube, shading coil & spring) and the valve (the body containing orifices in which the disc, diaphragm or piston is positioned…” Read More

5. Understanding Solenoid Valves

Source: Understanding Solenoid Valves

“Direct operated solenoid valves function to directly open or close the main valve orifice, which is the only flow path in the valve. Direct operated valves are used in systems requiring low flow capacities or in applications with low pressure differential across the valve orifice. The sealing surface that opens and closes the main valve orifice is connected to the solenoid plunger. The valve operates from zero pressure differential to maximum rated pressure differential (MOPD) regardless of line pressure. Pressure drop across the valve is not required to hold the valve open…” Read More

6. Solenoid Valve Technology for Upstream Oil and Gas Heating Equipment

Source: Solenoid Valve Technology for Upstream Oil and Gas Heating Equipment

“At remote installations, power is often in short supply, so that valves may draw electrical power from generators, solar arrays or battery packs. Also, valves that don’t use wellhead gas for pneumatic power require added equipment such as compressors, filters, regulators and lubricators. So users prefer control equipment that minimizes power consumption as much as possible.

Most early solenoid valves used in these applications continuously drew over 20 W of power: a distinct drawback for many users. In succeeding years, valve designers re-engineered their products, striving to cut power consumption for remote applications. Almost all models are now much improved…” Read More

7. Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve Animation

Source: Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve Animation – YouTube

How does a direct-acting solenoid valve work? This video will help you understand the basic operation principle.

8. Answers to your technical questions on Solenoid Valves & Pressure Operated Valves

Source: How do solenoid valves work | Solenoid Valve technology

Simple on/off valves are the most popular as many process lines only need flow or no flow.  Solenoid valves can be used in factories/plants where compressed air is not available. They can also be used in place of larger valves such as electrically actuated ball valves, but without taking up anywhere near as much space. Operation is also much quicker than other valve technologies..” Read More

 

4 Best Control Valve Market Forecast For 2016 -2021


Where is the control valve market headed? What are the current factors driving the market?

Valves are relatively mature product. Many experts agree that design innovation has largely plateaued since the 1960’s.  As you will see in the article by world-renown expert Hans D. Baumann listed below, this is a becoming a major consideration in market growth. 

However, innovation is just one of many factors that determine the control valve market’s growth. Sales levels in any given year are primarily influenced by the performance of the industries that utilize the valves. The most common concern in the various forecasts listed below is the sharp decrease in the price of oil.

Below are listed the best control valve market forecasts for 2016 and beyond.

Let’s take a look:

1. Valve Magazine’s 2016 Market Outlook: Mostly Cloudy

Source: 2016 Market Outlook: Mostly Cloudy

An Insightful article that paints a grey picture of the market in general (with one bright spot) due to the these major factors:

  • The price of oil:-the big question is, when will demand begin to grow and prices rise again?
  • The slump in China’s economy.

However, the article concludes on a hopeful note. World population growth is expected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050 from it’s present level of 7 billion. The number of people living in cities is expected to jump from it’s current percentage of 60% to over 70%. This will put stress, strain and capacity problems on water delivery and wastewater systems. Which, in turn will increase the need for control valves.


2. Control Valves Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2015 – 2021

Source: Control Valves Market – Global Industry Analysis and Forecast 2015 – 2021

The Bottom Line:

According to the most recent market report published by Transparency Market Research titled Control Valves Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2015 – 2021, the control valve market was valued at US $7.74 billion in 2014. The report estimates the market to grow at a CAGR of 7.0% and reach US$12.14 billion by 2021. The much discussed report  provides a comprehensive analysis of the global control valves market as well as a control valve market forecast for the period from 2015-2021.

The report segments the global control valves market into three categories:

  • Pneumatic control valves
  • Hydraulic control valves
  • Electric control valves,

The market is divided geographically into four regions:

  •  North America
  • Europe,
  • Asia Pacific
  • The Rest of the world

Major factors driving the market are:

  1. Increasing investment in the oil and gas industry
  2. The growing number of pipeline installations for efficient fluid handling across different industries
  3. The sprouting demand of processed foods from the emerging markets like China, India and Brazil, which snowballs the demand for control valves to ensure efficient food processing.
  4. The increasing demand in the pharmaceutical industry for sophisticated and fast fluid handling systems.
  5. The rising number of industrial infrastructure projects in developing countries.

 

3. World Pipelines’ Summary of Transparency Market Research Control Valves Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2015 – 2021

Source: Control valves market forecast for 2015 – 2021

This post provides you with a free summary of the paid report above. It breaks down the data into easily digestible pieces and gives you the overall tone of the forecast.

 

 

4. International Society of Automation – Control Valves -An Update

Source: Automation Basics: Control valves – an update – ISA

While not a control valve market forecast per se, this is a very concise article on the cutting edge of control valve industry as well as a brief economic outlook of the market. 

The author, Hans D. Baumann, is a world-renown expert on control valves and the holder of over 103 U.S. patents.

Hans attributes some of  the current woes of the industry to the fact that over 85% of all control valves sold today rely on technology from the 1960’s. He argues that while the lack of innovation makes sense from an accountant’s point of view, it allows well established products to lack patent protection. This, in turn, makes these valves easy prey to “knock-offs.”

He then reveals promising new butterfly valve innovation as well as new ways to fight noise and cavitation.

Hans ends the post with his own economic outlook, which is “mildly optimistic.”

Very worth-while reading.

How To Size A Diaphragm Actuated Control Valve In 5 Easy Steps

 

The 5 Steps to properly sizing a diaphram actuated control valve using the Cv method.

The 5 Steps to properly sizing a diaphram actuated control valve using the Cv method.

We found this great blog post at www.wwdmag.com on sizing in diaphragm actuated control valve and adapted it into an infographic. Next time you need to size one, have this image handy. It will make sure that you are getting the right valve for the right application at the RIGHT Price!

Check out the original post here.

Get the Free Valve Sizing App on Your Phone or Tablet

Size Your Valve In The Field With Accurate Calculations of Process Cv’s
For Mobile Phones, Tablets & Desktop

Click here to access the FREE Sizing App

6 Considerations for Valve Selection You Can’t Afford To Ignore

Just how important is correct valve sizing and selection?

For many applications, valve sizing and selection will determine the ultimate success or failure of the larger process. The consequences of incorrect sizing are opening and closing failures, leakage, increasing energy consumption and costs, and premature wear of internal components. All of these factors spell poor control performance and skyrocketing costs.

According to Engineersjournal.ie, a systematic approach is recommended to minimize the risk in choosing the wrong control valve. But what kind of system? What are the most important variables in choosing the right valve for the right application?

Recently, I stumbled on an article written almost 30 years ago by Vinod Bhasin that amazed me with its useful simplicity. In it, he outlined 16 considerations for valve selection that engineers can’t afford to ignore. Unfortunately, quite a few of these factors are still ignored or overlooked, even today.

I’ve listed (in summary form) six of the most useful ones below. If you want to automate valve sizing and selection check out J Flow’s free sizing app here.

There’s an old saying, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” Like many of the tried and true nuggets of wisdom that have stood the test of time, it’s true and Mr. Bhasin’s article is a shining example of this. These considerations are easy to understand and easy to apply. You can use these six factors with ease the next time you have to sit down at your desk and spec a project.

Flow Medium

  • All fluids are not created equal, so start with understanding the kind of fluid that will flow through the valve:
  • Is It Highly Corrosive? If so you may need to specify a full port valve, so that the fluid may flow through without obstruction.
  • Is it Viscous? Yes? Consider Valves that have large and smooth flow paths, like ball, diaphragm, and plug valves. These valves can withstand the high pressure drops in piping caused by gummy fluids.
  • Does it contain fibrous particles? If yes, then you will need to consider valves that have port shapes that eliminate or minimize valve plugging by these particles. Examples are diamond port plug or V-plug and V-ball valves.

How Do You Want the Valve to Regulate The Flow?

  • Simple start and stop.
  • Throttle within a predetermined range.
  • Combination of the two.

Valve Size

You Need to size the control valve based on it’s Cv for the flow rate you want to achieve:

  • If not, the valve will not pass the desired flow.
  • The valve does not need to be the same size of the pipe.
  • Generally, it is worse to oversize the valve than undersize. Oversized valves operate at low openings, which can damage the valve seats.

Line Pressure vs. Valve Pressure Drop

  • The full line pressure is the valve upstream pressure.
  • The pressure drop is the difference between the upstream and downstream pressures.
  • The valve body is subject to the impact of full line pressure.
  • The line pressure determines the valve body rating.
  • The pressure drop determines the valve trim or seat rating.

Pressure Temperature Rating (P-T Rating)

  • The P-T rating is the maximum pressure which the valve can withstand at a specific temperature.
  • Varies with the materials used in its construction.
  • Valve body can generally handle higher pressures than the seat material.
  • Declines with an increase in temperature.
  • Valve standards specify the highest valve body pressure ratings at 100 F.

Valve Rangeability

Determining how much rangeability is needed is sometimes the single most important factor in valve selection.

  • Defined as the ratio of its maximum controllable flow to its minimum controllable flow
  • A Control valve with higher rangeability will control flow over wider flow rates.
  • Globe valves with a flat disc plug provide high rangeability ( 100 or higher)
  • Quarter turn valves, such as ball, plug and butterfly are best suited for a  rangeability of around 50.

Want to learn more about correct valve sizing? Go here

The original article appears here.

Get the Free Valve Sizing App on Your Phone or Tablet

Size Your Valve In The Field With Accurate Calculations of Process Cv’s
For Mobile Phones, Tablets & Desktop

Click here to access the FREE Sizing App

How a Double Block and Bleed Valve Works

You need to perform maintenance on one section of your process. You can’t afford to have the whole facility down while you remove the equipment for cleaning, you just need to isolate the one section. If only you had a compact valve or valve system that provided reliable isolation, so you could block off and depressurize just the section you’re working on. So what do you do? 

Introducing the J Flow Controls family of Double Block & Bleed valves, which stop process fluid from getting into areas where work is being done. Double Block and Bleed Valves can perform the task of three separate valves –two separate isolations and one drain valve.

Here Is How It Works:

  1. A Double Block and Bleed Valve is a trunnion-mounted ball valve that acts as a single unit with two seating surfaces.

 

    2. In the closed position, the Double Block and Bleed valve provides a seal against pressure from both ends of the valve with a means of venting or bleeding the cavity between the seating surfaces. 

 

    3. The means of venting the cavity is a bleed valve, which is smaller than the in-line valves.

 

    4. You close the ball valve and open the bleed valve. Now you can depressurize the line downstream and open it up to perform your maintenance.

   5. If any fluid leaked past the first valve, the bleed valve would drain it off before pressure built in the cavity. This would also act as a red flag to indicate the leakage.

 

Saves Time Space and Cost

The J Flow Controls Double Block and Bleed valves save time, space, and cost by reducing weight in critical areas, eliminating extra piping requirements as well as the need for expensive multivalve systems. In addition to removing equipment for service or repair while the facility continues in operation, you can use it anywhere you want to prevent product contamination. The Double Block and Bleed valve can also be used in multi-product manifolds.

 

  • Features & Benefits:
    • Three piece high performance ball valve
    • Body and end caps quality investment casting
    • Available in stainless steel, carbon steel and alloys
    • Blow-out proof stem design
    • 100% air tested under water at 80-100 psi
    • Working pressure: 2000 WOG
    • Temperature range: -20° to +600°F
    • ISO 5200 direct mounting pad
    • Locking device
    • 2000 psi
  • Size:
    • Ranges from 1/2″ – 2″

Get the Free Valve Sizing App on Your Phone or Tablet

Size Your Valve In The Field With Accurate Calculations of Process Cv’s
For Mobile Phones, Tablets & Desktop

Click here to access the FREE Sizing App

How a Double Block and Bleed Valve Works:
https://cvsizing.jflowcontrols.com/

In this video, you will discover what a double Block And Bleed Valve is, how the J Flow Double Block and Bleed valves are unique, as well as when you would use them..

We walk you through step by step on how double block and bleed valves work as well as the best applications to in which to use them.

Additive Manufacturing: The Seven Most Important Factors You Need To Know In 2015

 

Additive Manufacturing, also known as 3D Printing is one of the most talked about technologies in the engineering world today. Although, 3D Printing has actually been around since the early 1980’€™s, it ha€™s only really gained momentum in the last five years. Now, with innovative breakthroughs occurring almost monthly, additive manufacturing has moved to the forefront  of high level industrial and academic circle discussions as well as being promoted in the press as the next industrial revolution.

But when can we start to see and feel the impact of this startling, incredible technology in our business and daily lives?

What are some of the major challenges that additive manufacturing presents? How will it affect the valve industry? We’€™ve rounded up the best content on the internet to answer these questions and many more, so that you can grasp where exactly additive manufacturing is now and where it i€™s going in the very near future.. You might just be surprised.

1. 5 Ways Additive Manufacturing Will Improve Our Lives

Source: 5 Ways Additive Manufacturing Will Improve Our Lives [Infographic]

2. The First 3D-Printed Supercar

Meet Blade – a super-light sports car with a 3D printed chassis, designed as an alternative to traditional car manufacturing. Through 3D printing, entrepreneur Kevin Czinger has developed a radical new way to build cars with a much lighter footprint.

3. Additive manufacturing technologies – Risks and challenges

Chris Chung, Head of Strategic Research, Energy Technology discusses the risks and challenges associated with additive manufacturing (3D printing).

4. Sector Debate: Additive Manufacturing

Chapters:
Media Hype: 1:30
Industrial Setting: 4:54
Materials: 8:26
Software and Design: 12:36
Dirty Secrets: 19:10
Favorite current Project: 27:18

In the first of a new series for IET.tv, Additive Manufacturing is under the spotlight. Filmed at IET Birmingham: Austin Court and chaired by Sector Head Gordon Attenborough; four specialists from industry and academia scrutinise this technology, contesting the realities of its current use and realistic future.

5. Joseph DeSimone: What if 3D printing was 100x faster?

What we think of as 3D printing, says Joseph DeSimone, is really just 2D printing over and over … slowly. Onstage at TED2015, he unveils a bold new technique — inspired, yes, by Terminator 2 — that’s 25 to 100 times faster, and creates smooth, strong parts. Could it finally help to fulfill the tremendous promise of 3D printing?

 

6. Additive Manufacturing: Will It Change the Valve Industry? Valve Magaxzine

Additive manufacturing (AM), also called 3D printing, is likely to transform the production of physical goods, including valves and actuators, in the same way the Internet drastically changed the information business model. It is now possible through AM to manufacture goods at locations where they are needed rather than where labor costs are lowest. That kind of model could change the concept of “just-in-time delivery” to “just-in-time manufacture where it is needed.”

Source: Additive Manufacturing: Will It Change the Valve Industry?

7. Prepare for Disruption: 3-D Printing and the ‘Unimaginable Science Fiction’ of the Future

With the 3-D printing boom on the horizon, cautiously awaiting the next big thing is risky business.

Source: Prepare for Disruption: 3-D Printing and the ‘Unimaginable Science Fiction’ of the Future | Innovation content from IndustryWeek

The Ugly Truth About Cavitation

The UGLY Truth About Cavitation

Cavitation is a common problem in pumps and control valves that causes serious damage to these components as well as reducing their life expectancy. It can literally eat valve seats alive. These factors of course cause expensive delays in production and skyrocket equipment costs.

But what exactly is cavitation? How does it occur? and what factors are the main culprits in this phenomenon?

Read on to answer these questions as well as discover the quickest and easiest way to prevent cavitation…

1) Whenever You Are Using Liquid, There Is Always The Risk of Metal Erosion From Cavitation or Flashing

Wherever there is a restriction in flow, the decrease in pressure can cause a fluid to reach its vapor point.

Flashing occurs when the fluid vaporizes and remains a vapor. The metal erosion caused by flashing appears shiny and smooth, as opposed to that caused by cavitation, which is pitted and uneven. Cavitation occurs when the fluid vaporizes then reverts back into a liquid as the pressure increases downline.


2) How Does Cavitation Actually Occur?

As the liquid passes through a restriction like a valve, the liquid’s pressure decreases but its velocity increases. Vapor bubbles form when the fluid’s operational pressure drops below its vapor pressure. Downstream of the restriction, these vapor bubbles revert to a liquid from. However the pressure downstream can cause a indentation in the bubble. When this happens  “liquid micro jets” form, which can burst through the bubble and cause local pressure waves of up to 100,000 pounds per square inch. This implosion can cause severe damage to the valve plug, body and seat. 

3) What Factors Are The Main Culprits?

  1. The Construction Materials Used in the Valve
  2. The Length of Exposure to Cavitation
  3. Valve Size*
  4. The Design of Valve and Trim
  5. If There is Leakage When Valve is Closed

Of these factors, the fastest and easiest one for you to control is sizing the valve correctly. Having an oversized valve increases the chance of cavitation substantially.
Below is our FREE sizing app that you can use from your phone or tablet (itunes or Android) to size valves correctly, even in the field.

Get the Free Valve Sizing App on Your Phone or Tablet

Size Your Valve In The Field With Accurate Calculations of Process Cv’s
For Mobile Phones, Tablets & Desktop

Click here to access the FREE Sizing App

How To Size a Control Valve -The J Flow Controls Valve Sizing App

How to Size a Control Valve: To get Free Sizing App, Go Here:
https://cvsizing.jflowcontrols.com/

According Valve Magazine,  a good rule of thumb for sizing a control valve is that a control valve’s size “should be selected so that it will operate somewhere between 60 and 80% open at the maximum required flow rate and whenever possible, not much less than 20% open at the minimum required flow rate.”

While undersized valves are fairly uncommon due to fact they are not able to pass the required flow and are fairly easy to spot, oversized control valves are far more common than you would expect. Not only are oversized valves more expensive than is necessary, but because they are overly sensitive to even small changes in valve position, they can make exact adjustments to the required flow impossible.  For a great post from Valve Magazine on why valve sizing matters click here

In this video, J Flow Controls’ Ken McMurry shows you how to avoid these problems by being able to quickly and easily size a control valve on your iphone or Android device using the free J Flow sizing app. Typically, you can size your control valves in just a couple of minutes with this free software .
Ken reveals the 3 key questions you need to ask when sizing a control valve so that you can eliminate guesswork and expensive mistakes. These include:

  1. What is the inlet pressure?
  2. What is the outlet pressure?
  3. What is the flow rate?

He then walks you through step by step on how to go on the itunes store and download your free app and be correctly sizing your valves in just minutes.

J Flow Controls: http://jflowcontrols.com/
Connect With Us on FB: https://www.facebook.com/pages/J-FlowControls/111634112208818?

Get the Free Valve Sizing App on Your Phone or Tablet

Size Your Valve In The Field With Accurate Calculations of Process Cv’s
For Mobile Phones, Tablets & Desktop

Click here to access the FREE Sizing App

=======================================

Source: How To Size a Control Valve -The Jflow Controls Valve Sizing App – YouTube